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Monthly Archive: May 2019

Global yet green? How governance influences upgrading opportunities

By Valentina De Marchi.

The fragmentation of production and integration of trade creates important opportunities for firms and territories, especially if located in emerging economies, to grow and learn. Yet not all the global relationships are conducive of economic, social or environmental upgrading.

Upgrading in Global Value Chains

As a result of globalization, value chains are increasingly fragmented and have spread worldwide – a new era of international competition that is reshaping global production and trade and changing the organization of industries has emerged. The Global Value Chain (GVC) framework is particularly useful in understanding global dynamics because …

Thinking outside the box on corporate tax practice

By Sara Jespersen.

Multinational corporate tax payments – a persistent conundrum.

Corporate tax practice of multinational corporations (MNC) have been the topic of intense debate in the media and among policy makers in recent years. Most recently the news broke that Amazon would pay zero tax on their more than 11 billion profit in 2018. The OECD have coordinated a large project on the topic and involved countries around the world in discussing attempted solutions to the issue of “base erosion and profit shifting” which is the technical term for states finding it challenging to tax the profits of MNCs.…

Who cares about sustainable fashion?

By Erin Leitheiser.

Can ever-higher rates of consumption ever truly be sustainable?  Consideration of up-and-coming consumers will be key to making progress in the sustainability of the fashion industry.

Each year in May, Copenhagen hosts the Copenhagen Fashion Summit, which brings together fashion industry leaders to consider the environmental and social sustainability issues rife within the industry.  While this year’s event promises discussions on important supply-side issues like materials and design, circularity, supply chains, wages, and the like, there seems to be precious little time dedicated to demand-side issues, principally the role of consumers.  As such, this post offers …

Let Me Lend You a Hand: How Behavioural Economics Can Restore Trust in Science

By Noah Peters.

Society’s declining trust in science in general and economics in particular is a much debated topic. Martin Wolf’s recent commentary for the Institute of New Economic Thinking (INET) is only one way of addressing the conundrum. This blog post draws on two prominent contentions underpinning the obscure notion of distrust in economics. Firstly, economists (allegedly) live in their ivory towers surrounded by mathematical formulas no outsider would even vaguely understand. Secondly, they are accused of not being able to adequately forecast crises, let alone fend them off.

One increasingly influential sub-discipline in economics tries to overhaul these …